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No Place Like... (Monday 18th May)

 

Every great story needs a great setting. This is where the story takes place. You need to choose one of these settings for your writing this week:

Questions to talk about:

~ Where in the world is the picture?

~ What can you see?

~ What words could you use to describe the things you can see?

~ What would you be able to hear or smell?

~ What kind of atmosphere would you want to create when describing this setting?

 

Writing Tasks

Year 1

Choose one of the pictures.

You are going to write a description of the picture you have chosen. Try to use some interesting words to describe what the place is like.

~ What can you see in the place?

~ What words could you use to describe the different things you can see?

~ What can you hear in the place?

Remember to use your phonics to pinch out the words to help with your spellings.

If you want to, you can write as though you are in the place e.g. I can see a small cottage in the trees. There are pink flowers in front of the cottage.

 

Year 2

Choose one of the pictures.

You are going to write a description of the setting you have chosen. Try to use some interesting adjectives to describe what the place is like.

~ What can be seen in the place?

~ What interesting words could you use to describe the different things that are there?

~ What can you hear or smell in the place?

~ Can you start some sentences in different ways?

If you want to, you can write as though you are in the place e.g. I can see a small cottage inbetween the tall trees. There are beautiful pink flowers in front of the cottage.

There is a boxing up sheet at the bottom of the page to help with your planning if you would like to use it.

 

Years 3 & 4

Choose one of the pictures for your setting description.

Try to describe the place in as much detail as you can but remember you are not trying to write a story. (You don’t need any characters!)

~ Try to use adjectives and expanded noun phrases to describe the place

~ Think about all the senses – try to include details about them all

~ Try to use some fronted adverbials to start sentences e.g. Beside the canal, there are tall buildings with many windows.

~ Write in the present tense, describing the place now (even if you are doing the dinosaur one!)

~ Check your punctuation to make sure all your sentences start with a capital letter and end with a full stop

You could write as though you are there but without using ‘I’ like this: Dinosaurs roam around the edge of a glistening lake where the water shimmers in the sunlight. The sound of their roars can be heard from many miles away. In the distance, there are…

There is a boxing up sheet at the bottom of the page to help with your planning if you would like to use it.

 

Years 5 & 6

Choose one of the pictures for your setting description.

Try to describe the place in as much detail as you can but remember you are not trying to write a story. (You don’t need any characters!)

~ Use adjectives, adverbs and expanded noun phrases to describe the place

~ Try to use similes, metaphors or personification to make your description more effective

~ Think about all the senses – try to include details about them all

~ Use a variety of sentence openers: adverbs, fronted adverbials, conjunctions, verbs

~ Write in the present tense, describing the place now (even if you are doing the dinosaur one!)

~ Check your punctuation and try to use a more advanced range of punctuation e.g. commas, brackets, semi-colons

There is a boxing up sheet at the bottom of the page to help with your planning if you would like to use it.

 

Optional extra tasks:

  1. Draw what you think is just outside the picture of the setting, either to the left or right, and write a few sentences to describe what you have drawn
  2. Find a picture of a different setting on the internet (or draw one of your own) and write a description of that setting
  3. Imagine a character that could be in a story taking place in your setting. Write a description of that character.
  4. Imagine one of the places in the pictures is a holiday destination – create a leaflet persuading people to visit it on holiday.
  5. Write a diary entry of a day when you visited one of the places in the pictures – try to include as much detail about what you did in the place and what it was like as you can
  6. Write a short story set in the picture you chose – the story can be any style you choose!

The Imaginator (Monday 11th May)

 

 

 

The Imaginator is an incredible machine. It can create anything you imagine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questions to talk about:

~ Where is The Imaginator? Who created/found it?

~ What does The Imaginator need to work?

~ How does it make things?

~ What can you see or hear or smell when it is working?

~ Is there any limit to what it can make?

~ What would you use The Imaginator to make?

 

Please note that this week children in Year 3 can choose between two tasks according to preference and confidence. 

 

Writing Tasks

Year 1

You are going to write some instructions for how to use The Imaginator. Try to write them so someone else could make The Imaginator work. You will have to make up your ideas as no-body knows how this amazing machine works – apart from you!!

~ What do you need to make The Imaginator work?

~ What do you have to do to make The Imaginator work?

~ What can The Imaginator make?

~ How happens when The Imaginator is working? What can you see/hear/smell?

Remember to use your phonics to pinch out the words to help with your spelling and try to set out your instructions clearly. There’s an example at the bottom of the page to help you.

 

Year 2 and 3 (Option 1 for Year 3)

You are going to write some instructions for how to use The Imaginator. Try to write them so someone else could make The Imaginator work and include as much detail as you can. You will have to make up your ideas as no-body knows how this amazing machine works – apart from you!!

~ What do you need to make The Imaginator work?

~ What do you have to do to make The Imaginator work?

~ What can The Imaginator make?

~ How do you make sure The Imaginator makes the right things?

~ How happens when The Imaginator is working? What can you see/hear/smell?

Try to set out your instructions clearly and remember to use bossy (imperative) verbs to tell the person what to do. You could also write a list of what you need to start with! There’s an example at the bottom of the page to help you.

 

Years 3 & 4 (Option 2 for Year 3)

The Imaginator is an amazing machine that very few people have seen or understand.

Your task is to write a non-chronological report to tell people everything you know about The Imaginator.

You could imagine that you are writing for a book on incredible inventions or scientific discoveries. You will need to think about how to organise your writing so that you can tell the reader all about the machine, what it looks like, how it works and what it does. Remember non-chronological means not in time order.

~ Try to use interesting adjectives to describe The Imaginator

~ You could use adverbs to describe what happens when The Imaginator is working

~ You might be able to use some technical or scientific language

~ Make sure you make it clear what The Imaginator does

~ Think about how to organise your writing – you could use sub-headings to help you

If you would like to plan your ideas on a boxing up sheet, there is one you can print below. There is also an example to help you.

 

Years 5 & 6

The Imaginator is a phenomenal machine that very few people have seen or understand. It operates in a complex way and is incredible to watch.

Your task is to write a non-chronological report to tell people everything you know about The Imaginator, what it does and how it works.

You could imagine that you are writing for a book on incredible inventions or scientific discoveries. You will need to think about how to organise your writing so that you can tell the reader all about the machine, what it looks like, how it works and what it does. Remember non-chronological means not in time order.

~ Try to use interesting adjectives and adverbs to describe The Imaginator and what it does

~ Try to use some technical or scientific language to explain how it works

~ Make sure you make it clear what The Imaginator does and how to make it work

~ Make sure you start your sentences in different ways and not always ‘The Imaginator’ or ‘it’!

~ Think about how to organise your writing – you should use sub-headings to divide your writing into sections

~ You could also use bullet points or a ‘did you know?’ box

If you would like to plan your ideas on a boxing up sheet, there is one you can print below. There is also an example to help you.

 

 

Optional extra tasks:

  1. Create your own incredible machine that does something amazing – draw the machine and add some labels to say what it does
  2. Create an advert for The Imaginator – make it bold and eye-catching and make sure it includes enough information to make someone want to buy one!
  3. Write a story about the person who built The Imaginator and what they did with it – you can be as imaginative as you like
  4. Write a persuasive letter to Mrs Davies explaining why she should buy an Imaginator machine for the school. Make sure you include lots of really good reasons to persuade her!
  5. Write a non-chronological report about another invention – it could be a real invention or something you have made up!
  6. Write a diary for a day you used The Imaginator machine. What did it make and what happened?

'Bubbles' (Monday 4th May)

At this very strange time when our lives are completely different from normal, sometimes, being able to go somewhere in our imaginations is just perfect. Watch the video below and find out what happened to Gabby when she was walking on the beach.

Bubbles.mp4

Still image for this video

Questions to talk about:

~ What was Gabby doing at the start of the video?

~ What happened when she blew the bubbles

~ Where did she go and what did she see

~ How was Gabby feeling at different times in the video?

~ What did Gabby do at the end that was kind?

~ Why do you think she did this?

Writing Tasks

Year 1

Imagine you are Gabby. Imagine you were walking on the beach and you found the bubbles. Imagine you were able to ride on the bubbles and go into the sea and up to the stars

Write some sentences like a diary to say what happened to you (as Gabby) today.

You will need to say you found the bubbles and what happened when you blew them. Write in the first person (using I) because you are pretending you are Gabby. Use these questions to help you if you need to.

~ What did you find on the beach?

~ What happened when you blew the bubbles?

~ What did you see?

~ How did you feel?

Remember to use your phonics to pinch out the words to help with your spelling.

 

Year 2

Imagine you are Gabby and you were walking on the beach when you found the bubbles. Imagine it has got to the end of the day and you are writing your diary of what happened.

Write a diary to say what happened to you (as Gabby) today.

You will need to say you found the bubbles and what happened when you blew them. Write in the first person (using I) because you are pretending you are Gabby. Use these questions to help you if you need to.

~ What were you doing at the start?

~ What happened when you found the bubbles?

~ Where did you go and what did you see?

~ How did you feel when you were on the bubbles?

~ What did you do with the bubbles at the end?

You could start your writing like this:

This morning, I went for a walk on the beach. I was feeling a bit sad because my friends didn’t want to come with me. Then I saw a bottle of bubbles on the sand!

 

Years 3 & 4

Imagine you are Gabby and you were walking on the beach when you found the bubbles. Imagine it has got to the end of the day and you are writing your diary of what happened.

Write a diary to say what happened to you (as Gabby) today.

You will need to say you found the bubbles and what happened but you can also use your imagination to add extra detail if you would like to. Remember to write in the first person (using I) and the past tense.

~ Try to use interesting adjectives to describe the beach, the bubbles and where you travelled to

~ Include your thoughts and feelings about what was happening

~ Try to split your writing into separate paragraphs

If you would like to plan your ideas on a boxing up sheet, there is one you can print below.

 

Years 5 & 6

Imagine you were walking on the beach when you found the bubbles. You can base your writing on just what happened in the video or you can imagine that you travelled to other places as well on the bubbles.

Write a diary to say what happened to you today.

Remember to write in the first person (using I) and the past tense. You should write in chronological order and make sure you include thoughts and feelings as well as the facts of what happened.

~ Try to use interesting language choices to describe the beach, the bubbles and the places you travelled to

~ Use a variety of sentence lengths and openers

~ You can use informal language because a diary is an example of personal writing

~ Explain what you did with the bubbles at the end and why (You can change the detail from the video if you would like to.)

~ Write in separate paragraphs

If you would like to plan your ideas on a boxing up sheet, there is one you can print below.

 

Optional extra tasks:

  1. Create your own fantasy place that you could travel to on a bubble. Draw the place and label it with all the things you would find there. Try to use interesting words to describe it!
  2. Write a story about a child who keeps a special bottle of bubbles under their bed and uses the bubbles to travel to different places!
  3. Write a character description of Gabby describing both what she looks like and also the kind of person she is. Try to explain how you know what she is like.
  4. If you could travel anywhere in the world on a bubble, where would it be and why? Write at least one paragraph explaining why you would go to that place, what it would be like and what you would do when you got there!
  5. Write a poem about bubbles that could change the world – what would the bubbles do? Would they bring happiness? Or good health? Or would they carry messages between people? Might they capture memories to make sure you don’t forget them!? Be as imaginative and creative as you can!
  6. Write a diary for yourself for a day recently – remember to say how you felt and what you thought as well as what you did!

'Tuesday' (Monday 27th April)

Many of you last week went out for walks, did scavenger hunts, made nature collages and did various other activities outside. Since we have been blessed with such lovely weather recently, I thought this week’s writing prompt could have a nature focus. However, when you watch the video clip below based on David Wiesner’s book ‘Tuesday’, you will see that thinking about nature can be surprising and imaginative!

Tuesday.mp4

Still image for this video

Questions to talk about:

~ Where does the story take place?

~ What is the first clue that there is something strange?

~ What words could you use to describe the flying frogs?

~ What problems do the frogs cause?

~ Why do you think the book is called ‘Tuesday’?

~ What animal would you like to fly?

Writing Tasks

Year 1

What happened to the frogs in the story?

Write some sentences to describe what the frogs did in the story.

~ Where were the frogs?

~ What happened at 8 o’clock?

~ Where did the frogs go?

~ What did they do?

Remember to use your phonics to pinch out the words to help with your spelling.

 

Year 2

Imagine you woke up in the night and looked out your window and saw those flying frogs. I wonder what you could see. What were they doing?

Write what you could see out of your window when the flying frogs were going past.

~ What did the flying frogs look like?

~ What else could you see out of your window?

~ What were the flying frogs doing?

~ Were they getting up to any mischief or causing any problems?

You could start your writing like this:

Last night I woke up in the middle of the night. I looked out of my window and I couldn’t believe my eyes! I saw…

 

Years 3 & 4

David Wiesner wrote his book ‘Tuesday’ as a picture book with hardly any words. Think about what happened to the frogs in the story.

Write a short story of what happens in the book ‘Tuesday’.

~ Write in the third person (he, she, it) and the past tense

~ Try to use some descriptive language to describe the frogs, where they were and what they were doing

~ Use some speech to show what the frogs might have said to each other

~ Try to split your writing into separate paragraphs

If you would like to plan your ideas on a story mountain or a boxing up sheet, there are ones you can print below.

 

Years 5 & 6

Think about the key events of the story ‘Tuesday’. At the end, it shows pigs beginning to fly the following week. Maybe, every week, a different animal flies at 8pm on a Tuesday.

Write a story about what happens at 8pm on a different Tuesday. You can choose any animal to fly and you need to think about what it will do and where it will go.

~ Use interesting adjectives and adverbs to describe the animal and where it went

~ Start your sentences in different ways

~ Include speech to move the story on

~ Organise your writing in paragraphs and use accurate punctuation

~ You could include humour and/or suspense in your story and you could hint at which animal might fly next!

If you would like to plan your ideas on a story mountain or a boxing up sheet, there are ones you can print below.

 

Optional extra tasks:

  1. Draw a picture of a flying animal in a place it flies to. Add labels to describe the flying animal and the place.
  2. Create a storyboard of the story ‘Tuesday’ in the style of a comic strip. You could add simple speech bubbles to show what the frogs or other characters might be saying. (There is a template below you can print if you want to.)
  3. Write a diary entry as one of the frogs for that night. Remember to write in the 1st person and past tense. What did you do? What did you see? How did you feel?
  4. Write a recount of the events that happened that Tuesday night. You could imagine you saw everything and want to record it. Try to write the events in chronological order, keep to the third person (he, she, it) and use formal language.
  5. Write a newspaper article (Years 5&6 only) to report on the investigation into the strange lily pads found on the road. (Who discovered them first? What did witnesses say? What evidence of the flying frogs has been found?)
  6. Write a story about a different animal flying at 8pm on a Tuesday or imagine what strange thing might happen at 8pm on a Wednesday and write that story. Maybe everything changes colour or everything speeds up or machines are able to operate by themselves or…

 

If you enjoyed this book, you might like to watch some videos of other books by David Wiesner:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkyL8hRZUe8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1OpQ8eSrIE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MTKWnxzqvM

The Tiny Dragon (Monday 20th April)

This Thursday, 23rd April, it is St. George’s Day. St. George is the patron saint of England. One story about St. George includes him slaying a dragon which is why I have chosen this picture of a tiny dragon for this week’s writing.

 

Questions to talk about:

~ Where is the dragon from?

~ Why is it so small?

~ How would you describe the dragon?

~ Is the dragon magic?

~ Does the dragon stay that small or does it grow?

~ What happens to the dragon?

Writing Tasks

Year 1

Your friend has just found a tiny dragon in their garden.

Write some sentences to describe the dragon.

~ What does it look like?

~ Where has it come from?

~ What does it do?

~ What happens when it breathes fire?

Remember to use your phonics to pinch out the words to help with your spelling.

 

Year 2

One day you visited your friend, Sally, and she said she had something secret to show you. Sally put her hand under her bed and when she took it out there was a tiny dragon sitting on her fingers!

Write what happened on that day when Sally showed you the dragon.

~ What did the dragon look like?

~ Why did Sally have a dragon?

~ What happened while you were playing with the dragon in Sally’s bedroom?

You could start your writing like this:

At the weekend, I went to my friend Sally’s house to play. She said she had something secret to show me…

If you would like to use a boxing up sheet to help you plan your ideas, there is one below you can print.

 

Years 3 & 4

Imagine you visited someone you know well – a friend or family member. It was quiet when you suddenly heard a strange scratching sound. You asked what was making the sound and, after some persuasion, the person you were visiting said they would show you if you promised to keep it a secret! They got out a small cardboard box and inside was a tiny dragon…

Write a short story of what happened that day, what the dragon was like and what happened.

~ Try to use interesting adjectives to describe the dragon

~ Use some speech to show the conversation between the characters

~ Try to split your writing into separate paragraphs

If you would like to plan your ideas on a story mountain or use a boxing up planning sheet, there are ones you can print below.

 

Years 5 & 6

Your grandfather is distraught. The dragon egg that he had been incubating for 27 months only hatched two weeks ago and now the tiny dragon has escaped. Your grandfather has looked all over his house and thinks that the dragon may have climbed up the chimney. It could be anywhere but the woods behind your grandfather’s house are a good place to start.

Write a story about what happened as you try to find the missing dragon.

~ Use interesting adjectives and adverbs to describe the setting and characters

~ Start your sentences in different ways

~ Include speech to move the story on

~ Try to create suspense and excitement through your language choices

~ Organise your writing in paragraphs and use accurate punctuation

If you would like to plan your ideas on a story mountain or use a boxing up planning sheet, there are ones you can print below.

 

Optional extra tasks:

  1. Draw your own dragon and label it using descriptive language e.g. sharp claws, dagger-like teeth, bright green scaly skin, searing hot flames
  2. Create a ‘Wanted’ poster for the dragon (Focus on describing what it looks like and where it might be found. Why does it need to be caught?)
  3. Write an acrostic poem using the letters D R A G O N so each line describes what the dragon is like and what it does
  4. Write some instructions for looking after the tiny dragon (What does it eat? Where does it sleep? How should it be looked after? Does it need exercise?)
  5. Write a newspaper article (Years 5&6 only) to report on the discovery of a tiny dragon at South Hill Park. (Who discovered it? What did witnesses say? What has happened to the dragon now?)
  6. Write a different story including a tiny dragon – you can choose your own characters and setting and what happens.

 

If you would like to find out more about the history of St. George, check out these websites that have information and some activities to try:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/17816642

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/whats-on/st-georges-day/

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